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Weekend Hangouts with our Schlangs Out

Mon 17 Apr 2017, 12:43 pm by lil' poopie boy

Hi farm,
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This is a notice to tell you that rob and I are reaching ST this coming weekend, the 21st, 22nd, 23rd. I expect to be greeted by downie darkos ready to hangout whilst stoking our nice long cats and dogs.
So lets lets drink poison and ingest herbal remedies for our pain, lets camp at shark mountain or in the forest by the cemetery. Lets go to olearys or celebr8 or sunset diner or …


    Chemical Engineering.

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    Cephalo the Pod
    Charles Babbage

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    Aw, geez, math on a keyboard.

    Post by Cephalo the Pod on Mon 22 Aug 2016, 12:55 am

    Lesson 0 - High School Stuff (Part 7: Trigonometric Identities)
    A trigonometric identity is a relation betweem two different mathematical functions that involve trigonometric functions such as sin(x). They come in handy when simplifying mathematical expressions.

    So you know how sin(x)=opposite/hypotenuse of an angle on a right-angle triangle, right? And cos(x)=adjacent/hypotenuse, and tan(x)=opposite/adjacent?


    Well there's three others:

    • csc(x)=H/O=1/sin(x). This is the cosecant.
    • sec(x)=H/A=1/cos(x). This is the secant.
    • cot(x)=A/O. This is the cotangent.


    Hey, let's look back to Pythagorus's Theorem. O^2+A^2=H^2. We can get three trigonometric identities from this:

    • Divide by H^2 on both sides. That gets you [sin(x)]^2+
      [cos(x)]^2=1.
    • Divide by A^2 on both sides. That gets you [tan(x)]^2+1=[sec(x)]^2.
    • Divide by O^2 on both sides. That gets you 1+[cot(x)]^2=[csc(x)]^2.

    Honestly, only the first of those really gets used.

    Another useful set of identities is the dual-angle identities. When you have a trigonometric function where the input involves two angles, you can convert it into a different expression, and vice versa.



    These identities are helpful when, for example, you know the value of one angle but not the other.


    Last edited by Cephalo the Pod on Mon 22 Aug 2016, 2:44 pm; edited 5 times in total


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    Cephalo the Pod
    Charles Babbage

    Posts : 1796
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    Aw, geez, math on a keyboard.

    Post by Cephalo the Pod on Mon 22 Aug 2016, 12:58 am

    And I THINK that covers just about all the high school stuff needed to understand Chem. Eng.

    I think I'll start with the university-level math next, and then some basic kinematics.


    Last edited by Cephalo the Pod on Mon 22 Aug 2016, 2:52 pm; edited 2 times in total


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    TheCryptKeeper
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    Re: Chemical Engineering.

    Post by TheCryptKeeper on Mon 22 Aug 2016, 12:02 pm

    why not just edit the other post?


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    Cephalo the Pod
    Charles Babbage

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    Aw geez, I hope that made sense.

    Post by Cephalo the Pod on Sat 27 Aug 2016, 12:01 am

    Here we go

    Applied Mathematics - Integration
    So sometimes you wanna calculate the area under the curve. Specifically, a certain portion of the area under a curve, stretching from one x-value to another. An integral. This can be reinterpreted as calculating the area of an infinite number of infinitely thin rectangles that each extend to the curve.

    With each rectangle, you're multiplying a y-value by an infinitely small difference in two x-values. Sound familar? It's essentially the opposite of a derivative, where you're dividing by a small difference in x-values. This is why calculating an integral means finding the antiderivative of the equation you're given.

    Example: x^n, where n is a constant that isn't -1. The derivative would be n*x^(n-1). So the antiderivative would be [x/(n+1)]*x^(n+1).
    • If the integral you're calculating has two specific end points, you calculate the value ls of the integral equation at both end points, and then you subtract the value at the first end point from the value at the second end point.
    • If you have no specific end points, you need to add a nondescript constant to the integral equation, because something like that won't affect the original derivative.


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    TheCryptKeeper
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    Re: Chemical Engineering.

    Post by TheCryptKeeper on Thu 01 Sep 2016, 4:39 pm

    calculus is so sick. math is just a beaut dude.


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